Awards - 23° Religion Today Film Festival

Wednesday, 30 September, 2020

 

AWARDS INTERNATIONAL JURY

 

XXIII EDITION 2020

GRAND PRIZE IN THE SPIRIT OF FAITH

ORDER AND SOUL by Zsuzsanna Bak

 

SPECIAL MENTIONS GRAND PRIZE IN THE SPIRIT OF FAITH

Il Sistema Sanità - Le Pietre Scartate by Andrea De Rosa, Mario Pistolese

Re\entry by Ben Brand

The Wind by Hamid Jafari

 

XXIII EDITION 2020

BEST DOCUMENTARY

MOTHER FORTRESS by Maria Luisa Forenza

 

SPECIAL MENTION BEST DOCUMENTARY

The Wind by Hamid Jafari

 

XXIII EDITION 2020

BEST FEATURE FILM

CASTLE OF DREAMS by Reza Mirkarimi

 

SPECIAL MENTION FOR BEST FEATURE FILM

The Unorthodox by Eliran Malka

 

XXIII EDITION 2020

BEST SHORT DOCUMENTARY

OJAGH by Ali Bolandnazar

 

XXIII EDITION 2020

BEST SHORT FILM

Kusebek Guo Zhongyuan

 

SPECIAL MENTION BEST SHORT FILM

My Kingdom by Guillaume Gouix

Re\entry by Ben Brand

SPECIAL AWARDS

 

XXIII EDITION 2020

RELIGIONS THROUGH WOMEN'S EYES

Speciale TG1 "Figlie di un Dio minore" By Amedeo Ricucci

Interreligious jury, Arco municipality

 

SPECIAL MENTION RELIGIONS THROUGH WOMEN'S EYES

CLAUSURA 4.0 BY ELISABETTA CASTANA

 

XXIII EDITION 2020

IN THE SPIRIT OF PEACE

NOVEMBER 1st. by Charlie Manton

Trentino Forum for peace and human rights jury

 

SPECIAL MENTION IN THE SPIRIT OF PEACE

MY NAME IS PETYA by Daria Binevskaya

 

XXIII EDITION 2020

PEOPLES AND RELIGIONS

RISING SILENCE by Leesa Gazi

CinemAmore jury

 

XXIII EDITION 2020

IN THE SPIRIT OF THE DOLOMITES

AVATARA BY Nadav Harel

 

XXIII EDITION 2020

MIGRATIONS AND COEXISTENCE

HARBOR by Paul Marques Duarte

MISSIONARY DIOCESAN CENTRE jury

 

XXIII EDITION 2020

New gazes

Masel Tov Cocktail by Arkadij Khaet, Mickey Paatzsch

Salesian Pontifical University jury

 

XXIII EDITION 2020

FILM FOR OUR FUTURE

MOSHE AND AMIRA by Eliot Gerber-Wilson

Film for our future jury

 

SPECIAL MENTION FILM FOR OUR FUTURE

Gimbal: A bet between tradition and economics by Sidiq Ariyadi

 

XXIII EDITION 2020

Best soundtrack

Finally Bhalobasha by Anjan Dutt

F.A. Bonporti Conservatory jury

SPECIAL MENTION Best soundtrack

PIPO AND THE BLIND LOVE by Hugo Le Gourrierec

 

XXIII EDITION 2020

SIGNIS AWARD

Samsara by Moon Jeong Yun

Signis jury

 

SIGNIS SPECIAL MENTION

Taj Mahal by Nyaz Mujawar

 

MOTIVATION

 

SPECIAL MENTION International Jury

 

The unorthodox

For showcasing an heroic struggle of a religious minority for justice and acceptance.

 

The wind

For taking the viewers on a time traveling adventure. Grand prize mention

For reminding us about humanity’s primeval fears.

 

The health system

for its multiway effectivity and sustainability in showing a true life project to overcome a wrong way of life and achieve happiness in being useful not only for yourself as well as for your environment.

 

My kingdom

Take off the veils and reach the sense of life.

 

Re-entry

The honorable mention for reentry which presents-show the tension between post religious materialism and longing for metaphysics.

 

CInemamore JURY

 

Touching and well constructed, the film Rising Silence gives a voice to the Birangona, the women who were kidnapped and tortured during the Bangladesh liberation war and recognized as war heroines many years later. With extreme delicacy is telling stories of violence and abuse , of abandonment and refusal by the society. The message of hope, peace and coexistence between people that the director wants to convey is by no means forced and is captured in the words of these women who, despite their wounds, physical and otherwise, do not hold grudges, but trust in a better future.

 

INTERRELIGIOUS ARCO JURY

 

The jurors decided to award the documentary “Figlie di un Dio minore”, directed by Amedeo Ricucci. The difficult and heavy story of Yazidi women whose human rights have been heavily violated is told through touching, intense and, at times, anguished images. It's a documentary whose main intent is to denounce and raise public awareness on topics of this importance.

In fact, as emerges from the words of the protagonists themselves, there is a real humanitarian emergency towards this ethnic minority, especially towards women and their children. At the end of the documentary it is understood that it is above all children, born in a state of captivity such as that of their mothers' imprisonment, who are victims and are destined to raise orphans, without even a mother who can do nothing but abandon them. All this happens under the eyes of the international community which doesn’t seem to take any initiative even for the protection of the minors abandoned to their sad fate.

 

 

The jury also decided to assign a special mention to “Clausura 4.0”, made by RAI.

What struck the most of this work were the very deep and intimate dialogues and the protagonists themselves whose genuineness, cheerfulness, vitality, beauty and sympathy stand out. It was possible to discover a world that has a notable development compared to the past, as it was possible to see through the comparison of the images recorded in the cloistered monasteries for the first time in 1958 by Sergio Zavoli. It was curious and funny to see how the Poor Clares still manage to deal with the outside world through the use of social media with which they are able to convey their thoughts, even outside the walls of the monasteries.

 

DOLOMITES JURY

 

Avatara explores the spirituality and everyday life of a Hindu community living in a remote Himalayan valley. By combining a careful anthropological perspective with an engaging narrative style, the work presents the practices and beliefs of families and priests that worship the divinities of this alpine space. In the Himalayan landscapes and in the cult of Shaktism, the spirit of the mountain emerges in its most unfathomable mystical features and in the most human ones rooted in the uses and customs of tradition. The paths, the mondine, the rituals in the damp woods and the curious gazes of the children, tell of a daily and mysterious alpine spirituality, capable of inhabiting the divine and the human.

 

JURY FORUM FOR PEACE

 

The jury of the Trentino Forum for Peace and Human Rights awards the film "November 1st" for its ability to impress, thanks to the convincing female interpretations and careful direction, a complex and delicate issue, the death penalty, from an unusual point of view, through the eyes of the victims' families and not through the guilty party or his defenders. Charlie Manton's film gives us an emblematic tale of a life that remains stuck, underlining the psychological impact and the suffering experience of the protagonist through the years and the fine line between justice and revenge.

 

CONSERVATORY F.A. BONPORTI TRENTO JURY

 

The film Finally Bhalobash is particular for how the three stories intertwine and for the unpredictable ending that brings them together. The musical material belongs to the Indian composer Neel Dutt, a Bengali musician and guitarist born in 1979 and therefore in the midst of his artistic production.

The soundtrack is original and adheres very well to the scenes. We particularly liked the Chhiley Bondhu song in Bengali. We also liked koto koto Mon, very romantic, the words of Anjan Dutt, director of the film who is also an actor and songwriter, sung by Madhubanti Bagchi. Nice introduction with the trumpet. Looking at musical careers that are significant.

 

In the short film category we reward the Pipo and the blind love soundtrack, for the strength of the message. The power of music can awaken the feelings of those who don't experience them. It brings us closer to the magic and the hidden force of music and why mankind cannot live without it.

SALESIAN PONTIFICAL UNIVERSITY JURY

We didn’t found evident elements that deal with the theme of the “Earth I care” festival precisely and unambigously we chose to award Masel Tov Cocktail for being prominent over the other films selected for it’s social urgency and topicality.

The film deals with the socio-ideological situation of a Germany that is witnessing an ambivalent attitude towards the memory of the Holocaust with pungent and pleas3antly colorful irony: there are those who dramatize by generalizing the almost mythological figure of "the Jew" and those who ignore what Auschwitz meant. Masel Tov Cocktail brilliantly responds to the urgent need to "not forget" and at the same time to "not trivialize” because letting the past fade has always been synonymous with relapse into the same mistakes.

From a technical point of view, for aesthetics and technique, the short uses stimulating tricks, such as the gaze in the car of the protagonist, for interacting with the viewer, the alternation of color with black and white, superimposed captions, intelligent use of breaking the "fourth wall” allowing the viewer to travel arm in arm with the protagonist throughout the story, to discover what it means to be Jewish in today's Germany. The attention to interreligious and geopolitical issues nearly change the short in a documentary.

 

Missionary Diocesan Centre jury

 

The film Harbor shows the everyday life that can belong to anyone, maybe a little stereotyped, unexpectedly distorted by an unexpected presence that forces the protagonists to review their role, their certainties, fears and prejudices towards themselves and towards the others. In the end, finding themselves united by the same sensitivity and the same objectives.

An original and, at times, deliberately paradoxical way to describe the theme of immigration, with a game of contrasts and unexpected situations, aimed at reflecting not so much on the migrant, but on ourselves, on our attitudes and on our principles.

 

Film for our future jury

 

An unusual couple — she’s Muslim, he’s Jewish — face being together with both their parents at one dinner table. Through small actions, sights and words there is a possibility of building bridges between different cultures. But at the same time, there is the challenge of fighting for that same cultural identity in a racist society. Through a deep and original character construction a commonly-known conflict becomes a situation we all can relate to — a dinner. By opening the wide array of human emotions connected to merging cultures, the filmmaker builds tension, by tightening and easing the arc of the story. Tensions are not immediately revealed in an obvious way, but build through a combination of sights and camera angles. 

The film reminds us of the absurdity of discrimination by eliminating every stereotype, and by setting an average story in a familiar situation, one that almost everyone has experienced. During this dinner, a cultural divide plays out. While boundaries work as a virtual barrier, the family experiences a harmonoius exchange. Eventually the contradictions in life come to a head. In conclusion, the parents get along quite well, but it‘s other difficulties the young couple faces that create the real distance and it’s between them — the protagonists.